ASHRAE Standing Standard Project Committee 62.2 (SSPC 62.2)
Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in
Low-Rise Residential Buildings

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This project committee is responsible for maintaining ASHRAE Standard 62.2,
Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings

Standard 62.2-2013 -- Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings (ANSI/ASHRAE Approved)

Standard 62.2 was first published in 2003 as the first national ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) standard developed specifically for low-rise residential buildings via the ANSI process. It has been maintained since then using the ANSI and ASHRAE continuous maintenance procedures. Users of the standard are encouraged to use these procedures to propose changes to the standard. The committee will consider and take formal action on every proposal received. Forms and procedures for submitting change proposals may be found on ASHRAE’s Web site at www.ashrae.org. When proposed addenda are available for public review and when approved addenda are published, notices will be published on ASHRAE’s Web site. The standard is now published in its entirety every third year and includes all approved addenda and errata. This procedure allows users to have certainty about when the new editions will be published. This 2013 edition incorporates the contents of 17 addenda into the 2010 edition, which were processed by the committee and approved by ASHRAE and ANSI. For brief descriptions of the addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010, see Informative Appendix C.

When this standard was published in 2004 and 2007, relatively few changes were made to the original 2003 edition. However, since 2003, extensive experience has been gained in the application of this standard due to its adoption by various building codes and use in numerous building programs. As such, many clarifications and improvements have been identified and incorporated through the approved addenda for the 2010 edition and again in the 2013 edition. The standard follows the same overall approach as before; however, the mechanical ventilation rates have been increased to reflect the elimination of the default assumption of a leakage rate of 2 cfm per 100 ft2. Houses and apartments are being built tighter for both energy and code reasons. Therefore, the 2013 standard assumes that there is no reasonable expectation of leakage in multifamily buildings and that single-family homes must be measured for leakage with a blower door to estimate the amount of leakage that can be deducted from the calculated mechanical ventilation rate. The base assumption is now 7.5 cfm per person plus 0.03 cfm per square foot. Other significant new changes include the removal of the climate limitations on pressurization and depressurization (Addendum g), a requirement for carbon monoxide alarms in all dwelling units (Addendum l), and new calculations and weather data for estimating annual leakage based on a blower door test (Addendum n).

As in the previous editions of this standard, there are three primary sets of requirements and a number of secondary ones. The three primary sets involve whole-building ventilation, local demand-controlled exhaust, and source control. Whole-building ventilation is intended to dilute the unavoidable contaminant emissions from people, from materials, and from background processes. Local demand-controlled exhaust is intended to remove contaminants from those specific rooms that, because of their design function, are expected to contain sources of contaminants (e.g., kitchens and bathrooms). Other source control measures are included to deal with those sources that can be reasonably anticipated to be found in a residence. The standard’s secondary requirements focus on properties of specific items that are needed to achieve the main objectives of the standard. Examples of this include sound and flow ratings for fans and labeling requirements.

This standard does not address specific pollutant concentration levels. It also does not address certain potential pollutant sources such as unvented combustion space heaters and contamination from outdoor sources or from episodic occupant-controlled events such as painting, smoking, cleaning, or other high-polluting events. For information on residential ventilation and IAQ beyond the minimum requirements contained in this standard, users may wish to consult the companion guideline, which was also developed by ASHRAE Technical Committee 4.3. ASHRAE Guideline 24-2008, Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings, provides explanatory and educational material not appropriate for a code-intended standard and addresses IAQ and ventilation issues where consensus could not be achieved for inclusion in the standard.

> To view the title, purpose and scope (TPS) of this standard Click Here

ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is under continuous maintenance by SSPC 62.2 for which the Standards Committee has established a documented program for regular publication of addenda or revisions.

  • For more information on submitting a proposed change to this or any other ASHRAE Standard that is under continuous maintenance.  Click Here

  • To download the latest published addenda to ASHRAE Standards  Click Here

    This project committee is responsible for ASHRAE Guideline 24-2008, Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings

  • To view the title, purpose and scope (TPS) of this guideline Click Here

    Revised Date:
    August 28, 2014

  • Upcoming Meetings:
    ASHRAE 2015 Winter Conference, Chicago, IL
    January 23-28, 2015

    “This

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2013 Now Available:
    The 2013 edition includes Addenda b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, q, r, u and v to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010

    ASHRAE Guideline 24-2008 Available:

    “This

    To purchase a copy of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2013 visit the ASHRAE Bookstore
    Click Here

    IAQ Applications Article/Winter 2006:
    Ventilation Standards and High Performance Buildings
    By David T. Grimsrud, Ph.D.
    To view the article  Click Here

    Do you want to get involved in this PC?
    If so, read through the pages of this site, attend a meeting, or contact our Project Committee Chair,Paul Francisco, at  pwf@illinois.edu